ABQLA/CLA/SLA Holiday Fundraiser for CODE

by Megan Fitzgibbons

The annual CODE fundraiser, a highly-anticipated tradition in Montreal’s library community, has taken place for an impressive 28 years. This year’s iteration had a different sparkle at a new venue, held on December 5, 2011 at Phillips Lounge in the city’s downtown sector.

FRBR in the Jewish Public Library

Imageby Eddie Paul

On a warm spring evening in Paris on May 29, 1913, an opulent crowd at the Champs Élysées Theatre rioted at the premiere performance of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. One shrewd musicologist wrote that "the pagans on stage made pagans of the audience." The piece is a celebration of pagan rituals that eventually leads to a sacrifice of a chosen young woman to propitiate the gods of spring.

No such harsh reaction greeted the introduction of RDA or FRBR to the library community back in 1997 when the new replacement for AACR2 was introduced by IFLA, although it certainly hasn’t been without resistance from some elements, possibly because paradigms (MARC is a little over 40 years old) and the people who conceive them shift just a bit more slowly than the tectonic plates. The gods of spring are also not that easily propitiated, especially when the propitiators are limited by consensus and cataloguing subcommittees.

Reading online: too distracting?

Sandra Bebbington Information Literacy Coordinator-MELS DSCA SAR

In a recent discussion I had with someone about tablets in the school library, it was brought to my attention that some people see tablets has having the potential of distracting people from reading. With all the additional abilities that tablets have such as apps or web access they detract from the e-reader aspect of the device. My response was simply - so??

CLA Awards Program

From the CLA

CLA is pleased to announce a new structure for our awards. The structure was approved by Executive Council in December 2011, based on a report and recommendations from an Awards Review Task Force chaired by Past President Keith Walker.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - 16th Annual Writing for Children Competition, $1,500 PRIZE

The Writers’ Union of Canada is pleased to announce that submissions are being accepted until April 24, 2012 for the 16th annual Writing for Children Competition. The winning entry will be the best Canadian work of up to 1,500 words in the English language, fiction or non-fiction, written by an unpublished author.

PRIZE
$1,500 for the winning entry, and the entries of the winner and finalists will be submitted to three Canadian children’s publishers.

Dystopian fiction for Young Adults

ImageIf you have been engaged in reader’s advisory for young adults for the past couple of years, you might have noticed an increasing interest in dystopian fiction. The forthcoming release of the movie Hunger Games (March 23rd 2012) based on the book series by Suzanne Collins with the same title stirs the spirits and invites for a compilation of suggested readings lists that will appeal to young patrons who crave to prolong the pleasure of sharing exciting adventures in this genre.

Dystopian fiction is not new – it is a subdivision of the Science Fiction genre and sees its roots in the works of H.W. Wells, William Golding, Ray Bradbury... The most famous dystopian novel would be 1984, by George Orwell.

TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2012

An annual event promoting literacy and bringing together authors and illustrators with their audiences, the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week will be held nationwide from May 5th – 12th 2012. In Montreal, the ABQLA jointly with the Canadian Children’s Roundtable is glad to organize the visit of author Caroline Pignat. Winner of numerous awards, amongst which is the prestigious Governor General Literary award for Children’s Literature (text) in 2009 for her historical fiction “Greener Grass,” the author will be with us to speak about her creative moments and inspiration.

Open Access Update

Submitted by Joanna Duy

On November 28, 2011, the ABQLA College and Research Section hosted an “Open Access Update” at Concordia’s Webster Library, exploring open access initiatives at the McGill and Concordia University libraries, as well as through national funding agencies.

The speakers were:

Maurice Sendak Storytelling Workshop

ImageBy Karen Biskin

Throughout his prolific career, Maurice Sendak transformed the landscape of children’s literature, conjuring the monsters of childhood dreams onto the pages of his books. On Thursday, November 3, 2011, the Public, School and Youth Sections of the ABQLA celebrated Sendak’s writing during a storytelling workshop held at the Jewish Public Library. Professional storyteller Selina Eisenberg-Smith animated the evening, using a felt board, puppets, and props to explore the various ways to engage children in a story. After her artistic retelling of In the Night Kitchen, she had the group participate in its own wild rumpus and then perform Pierre, a Cautionary Tale with her. She shared her experiences working with children of different ages and explained how she adapts children’s books in order to perform them for a audience.

Out from the Stacks: Librarians Without Borders in Guatemala 2011

Authors: Rebecca Burbank, Carolyn Doi, Nouf Khashman, Emily McHugh, Amanda Oliver

This article presents reports from four Librarians Without Borders student volunteers from McGill University who recently participated in a service-learning assignment at a school library in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

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